Puigaudeau, Ferdinand du

FERDINAND LOYEN DU PUIGAUDEAU (French, 1864-1930)
Nature Morte, c. 1890
(Still Life with Fruit and Flowers in a Breton Landscape)
Oil on canvas, 20 x 24 inches (50.8 x 61.cm)
Signed lower right: F. du Puigaudeau
(28 x 32 inches framed)

Provenance: Kaplan Gallery London
Private collection, Los Angeles

Ferdinand du Puigaudeau (French, 1864-1930) Born in Brittany, Ferdinand du Puigaudeau belongs to a generation of artists which flourish after Impressionism, working at the same time as the Nabis and Neo Impressionists. A close friend of both Gauguin and Degas, he was a seminal member of the Pont Aven art colony which flourished as a center of Post-impressionism in the 1880s. By the 1880s, numerous artists of a modern tendency worked in the region and adopted vivid color use and created compositions that utilized simplified space with sharply defined forms, influenced by a new interest in Japanese art. Puigaudeau was part of this colony and hence contributed to the birth of the “Pont-Aven School”.

His approach is highly personal. His technique involved applying vibrant color to separate tones and brushstrokes to achieve certain effects of light, combined with a more structured approach towards certain objects that gives prominence to detail. Puigaudeau claimed to believe in “color above all else,” and his paintings glow with vivid hues of red, blue, green, and yellow.

Puigaudeau has only recently acquired public recognition, partly owing to financial difficulties which he experienced throughout his life, his inclination towards solitude, and loss of 60 paintings during an exhibition in New York.

Museum Collections include:
Madrid, Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum; Morlaix, Musée Jacobins; Nantes, Musée des Beaux-Arts; Quimper, Musée des Beaux-Arts; Musée Saint Nazaire;

Bibliography:
Laurentin, Antoine, Ferdinand du Puigaudeau Catalogue Raisonné, Editions Thierry Salvador, Paris, 1989.
LePaul, Judy, Gauguin and the Impressionists at Pont-Aven, Abbeville Press, New York, 1987.